Do you work abroad?

Whether you have emigrated from the UK to a different country, or have always lived and worked in another country, the FHT would love to hear from members who work abroad to help us put together an article for International Therapist. 

If you would like to be involved, please email jreeves@fht.org.uk, answering the questions below.

Closing date: Sunday 8th June 2014

1. Which country do you live and work in?  

2. Tell us a little about your therapy work abroad….

3. Have you…. 

..always lived/worked in this country (Go to question 9)

…emigrated to this country (Go to question 4)

4. Did you train in the UK, or the country in which you now live?

5. Were your qualifications recognised abroad and ‘transferrable’, or did you need to go through various hoops? Are the standards the same?

6. What is the same and what are the differences between working in the UK and abroad?

7. What are the main considerations you have had to take into account when working somewhere other than the UK?

8. Are there any challenges you have faced working abroad (communication problems, e.g. understanding accents, cultural differences, etc)

9. What are the benefits of working in your country?

10. Is there regulation for therapy practice in your country?

11. Do you belong to a professional association in the country where you practise? 

12. Do you have insurance in the country where you practise?

13. What are the CPD opportunities like in your country, in terms of being able to build upon your existing knowledge/skills? 

14. Are complementary therapies widely accepted by the medical profession in your country? 

15. Any additional comments that you would like to add…..

Are you happy for the FHT to publish your comments in International Therapist and on the FHT website?

If you answered yes to question 16, and are happy for the FHT to publish your comments, are you happy for your name to be included alongside your comments?

Are you happy for the FHT to contact you for further information about your work in this field?

Thank you giving us an insight into your work.

Image: iStockphoto

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Following a huge increase in steroid use, NICE has updated its guideline on the provision of needle and syringe programmes for adults and young people, as reported by Human Kinetics

Many needle and syringe programmes have reported an increase in the number of steroid users, particularly among men aged 18-25, presenting in the last few years, fuelled by the increasing pressures to look good.

For example, CRI runs 21 needle exchanges in England and in 2010 it saw 290 people who were using steroids. By 2013 that number had increased to 2,161, a rise of 645%.

Full article »

Image: iStockphoto

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At a newsstand near you…

FHT adverts appear in the April issue of Healthy (pictured), available at Holland & Barrett, and Your Healthy Living, at all good newsagents. The vibrant adverts direct the public to our Find a Therapist search, also emphasising accreditation of the FHT’s Complementary Healthcare Therapist Register by the Professional Standards Authority. If you haven’t yet updated your online profile, click here.

View adverts and schedule »

Images: iStockphoto and Healthy

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It’s Bowel Cancer Awareness month!

Help raise awareness by sharing Macmillan Cancer Support’s free information booklets, including: ‘Are you worried about bowel cancer?’ and ‘Understanding Colon Cancer’.

Download booklets here

Image: Macmillan Cancer Support

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The Irish Times has reported on a proposed new funding model for the Irish healthcare system

In essence everyone would be a private patient. It would be mandatory for all to have cover for a basic package of services - known as a basket - from one of a number of different insurers.
The State would pay the premium for the lowest income groups and provide subsidies for others. People who refused to take out cover would have it provided for them, with the cost deducted at source from their earnings or benefits.

Full article »
Government white paper, ‘The Path to Universal Healthcare’ »
Image: iStockphoto

The Irish Times has reported on a proposed new funding model for the Irish healthcare system

In essence everyone would be a private patient. It would be mandatory for all to have cover for a basic package of services - known as a basket - from one of a number of different insurers.

The State would pay the premium for the lowest income groups and provide subsidies for others. People who refused to take out cover would have it provided for them, with the cost deducted at source from their earnings or benefits.

Full article »

Government white paper, ‘The Path to Universal Healthcare’ »

Image: iStockphoto

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National Massage Day

The FHT is happy to support the concept of positive touch and the Manifesto for a Pro-Touch Society. Here’s one supporting activity you may want to put in your diary… 

It’s ‘National Massage Day’ on Friday 16th May, where everyone in the UK is encouraged to reach out and touch someone they care for. 

Find out more and get involved »

Image: Gill Tree

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April’s FHTNews is out! In our monthly e-newsletter, we update you about your membership and what’s happening in the therapy world.

Members, check your inbox for the latest news and information.

Images: iStockphoto, FHT, Healthy and Gill Tree

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BBC Good Food: essentials for marathon final prep 
BBC Good Food.com has curated a wealth of information including last minute tips for marathon runners ahead of this weekend’s race. Sports nutritionist James Collins has advised Team GB on their Olympic nutrition and here provides essential advice and tips for the day before, during and after the big race.
”Fuelling for training is vital for optimal performance” says James. ”The main fuel for training is carbohydrate, which is stored in the muscles and liver as glycogen, which the body draws upon for energy. The body is only able to store a relatively small amount of carbohydrate, which is why keeping it topped up is so important.”
On the morning of the Marathon, James Collins suggests overall fuelling; “What you eat on the morning of your event should link into an overall fuelling strategy that you have developed during your training. Eat a meal two - four hours before the start of the race, and include a range of foods depending on your taste.”
Good breakfast options for the morning of your race may include:
Pancakes and mixed toppings, such as fruits and nuts
Porridge oats with milk or soy milk
Granola with milk or soy milk
Multigrain bread topped with eggs
Fruit salad and low-fat Greek yogurt
Bagels or breakfast muffins with low-fat cottage cheese
Fruit juice or a fruit smoothie
For energy-boosting during the race, If you already regularly consume caffeine as part of your diet, this can be a usual alternative to carbohydrates for an energy boost. There are commercially available sports drinks and gels containing caffeine, which can be extremely useful, especially later in the race.
James suggests refuelling during the race to keep up energy levels;
"Don’t rely on hunger as a cue to refuel during the race. As a general rule, practice and refine your fuelling during training and find a strategy you’re comfortable with. Taking on carbohydrate little and often, for a constant energy supply, is often the most efficient strategy."
As a rough guide, approximately 30-60g of carbohydrate an hour will be your target during the marathon, as the body can absorb this amount and use it for energy on the move. Carbohydrate drinks are typically the most efficient way to meet these targets, alongside good hydration. Carbohydrate gels will also be readily available on race day and are rapidly absorbed. Small pieces of banana, cereal bars and jellied sweets also can help to offset hunger.
The following will provide around 30g of carbohydrate - see what works best for you and experiment with quantities during training:
500ml bottle of commercially available sports drink
One and a half carbohydrate energy gels
A small handful of jellied sweets
One large banana
One large cereal bar or carbohydrate based energy bar (choose a low-fibre option)
Finally, that all important recovery post run, James suggests eating within 30 mins after running -  ”Your body needs essential nutrients to kick start the growth and repair process after a hard training session. Carbohydrates are the body’s main fuel source, and are stored as glycogen in the muscles and liver. As the body can only store a certain amount of carbohydrate, once depleted through exercise these reserves need to be replaced before your next training session”
Protein is vital for the growth and repair of muscle tissue and as hard training depletes the body’s stores it is important to refuel with high-protein snacks as soon as possible. Ensuring you replenish stores after each training session can significantly reduce muscle soreness the following day. If you can’t face eating straight after a run, introduce fluids to your recovery strategy.
20g of protein is the magic number that you need to hit to optimise the recovery process after training. The following snacks will help you reach this target:
500ml milkshake
Natural yogurt based fruit smoothie
Sandwich with lean meats, eggs, or low-fat cheese
Greek yogurt, granola and mixed berries
For further information, the BBC Good Food website offers a huge range of tips and suggestions for diet around exercise at its marathon hub containing all the information runners will need this weekend.
http://www.bbcgoodfood.com/howto/guide/marathon-training-and-nutrition
Image: iStockphoto

BBC Good Food: essentials for marathon final prep 

BBC Good Food.com has curated a wealth of information including last minute tips for marathon runners ahead of this weekend’s race. Sports nutritionist James Collins has advised Team GB on their Olympic nutrition and here provides essential advice and tips for the day before, during and after the big race.

”Fuelling for training is vital for optimal performance” says James. ”The main fuel for training is carbohydrate, which is stored in the muscles and liver as glycogen, which the body draws upon for energy. The body is only able to store a relatively small amount of carbohydrate, which is why keeping it topped up is so important.”

On the morning of the Marathon, James Collins suggests overall fuelling; “What you eat on the morning of your event should link into an overall fuelling strategy that you have developed during your training. Eat a meal two - four hours before the start of the race, and include a range of foods depending on your taste.”

Good breakfast options for the morning of your race may include:

  • Pancakes and mixed toppings, such as fruits and nuts
  • Porridge oats with milk or soy milk
  • Granola with milk or soy milk
  • Multigrain bread topped with eggs
  • Fruit salad and low-fat Greek yogurt
  • Bagels or breakfast muffins with low-fat cottage cheese
  • Fruit juice or a fruit smoothie

For energy-boosting during the race, If you already regularly consume caffeine as part of your diet, this can be a usual alternative to carbohydrates for an energy boost. There are commercially available sports drinks and gels containing caffeine, which can be extremely useful, especially later in the race.

James suggests refuelling during the race to keep up energy levels;

"Don’t rely on hunger as a cue to refuel during the race. As a general rule, practice and refine your fuelling during training and find a strategy you’re comfortable with. Taking on carbohydrate little and often, for a constant energy supply, is often the most efficient strategy."

As a rough guide, approximately 30-60g of carbohydrate an hour will be your target during the marathon, as the body can absorb this amount and use it for energy on the move. Carbohydrate drinks are typically the most efficient way to meet these targets, alongside good hydration. Carbohydrate gels will also be readily available on race day and are rapidly absorbed. Small pieces of banana, cereal bars and jellied sweets also can help to offset hunger.

The following will provide around 30g of carbohydrate - see what works best for you and experiment with quantities during training:

  • 500ml bottle of commercially available sports drink
  • One and a half carbohydrate energy gels
  • A small handful of jellied sweets
  • One large banana
  • One large cereal bar or carbohydrate based energy bar (choose a low-fibre option)

Finally, that all important recovery post run, James suggests eating within 30 mins after running -  ”Your body needs essential nutrients to kick start the growth and repair process after a hard training session. Carbohydrates are the body’s main fuel source, and are stored as glycogen in the muscles and liver. As the body can only store a certain amount of carbohydrate, once depleted through exercise these reserves need to be replaced before your next training session”

Protein is vital for the growth and repair of muscle tissue and as hard training depletes the body’s stores it is important to refuel with high-protein snacks as soon as possible. Ensuring you replenish stores after each training session can significantly reduce muscle soreness the following day. If you can’t face eating straight after a run, introduce fluids to your recovery strategy.

20g of protein is the magic number that you need to hit to optimise the recovery process after training. The following snacks will help you reach this target:

  • 500ml milkshake
  • Natural yogurt based fruit smoothie
  • Sandwich with lean meats, eggs, or low-fat cheese
  • Greek yogurt, granola and mixed berries

For further information, the BBC Good Food website offers a huge range of tips and suggestions for diet around exercise at its marathon hub containing all the information runners will need this weekend.

http://www.bbcgoodfood.com/howto/guide/marathon-training-and-nutrition

Image: iStockphoto

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FHT Annual Training Congress  

19th and 20th July 2014 
East Midlands Conference Centre, NG7 2RJ 

This year, we are offering eight different learning streams for you to pick and choose from.  In this post, we are highlighting the ‘holistic beauty’ stream, offering two hands-on workshops on Saturday 19th July 2014 at the times listed below. 

Workshops

Making your own skincare

Ayurveda facial and timeless beauty secrets

BOOK NOW at www.fht.org.uk/2014

Images: iStockphoto and FHT

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The Oral Health and Performance in Sport conference in London discussed how dental health affects the training and performance of athletes

A study, published in the British Journal of Sports Medicine, showed a fifth of athletes said their oral health damaged their training and performance for the Games.

At the conference, dentists said tooth pain could disrupt sleep and training and that inflammation of the gums could affect the rest of the body, impairing performance.

It is not unusual for poor oral health to have wider effects. The NHS says it is linked to type 2 diabetes and heart problems.

Full article 

Image: iStockphoto

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