Massage research - a summary of evidence

The Association of Massage Therapists, Australia, has produced a summary of current evidence available for massage therapy for more than 25 conditions and populations including cancer, musculoskeletal pain, headaches, arthritis, HIV, and safety and cost effectiveness. All research cited has been classified according to the National Health and Medical Research Council’s evidence hierarchy.  

Access massage research summary »

Image: Shutterstock

comments

The darker side of oxytocin

The hormone oxytocin is normally linked to trust, bonding and emotional sensitivity, and is commonly referred to as the ‘love hormone’ or ‘cuddle chemical.’  However according to an article recently published by The Scientist, a recent study has indicated that the hormone can make people more dishonest if it serves the interests of their group…

Read the full article »

Image: iStockphoto

comments

"The pressure was too hard, too soft; I said too little, too much, the wrong thing. But that’s life, and life is what’s needed in the final few days."

If you have ever worked in a hospice, you will be familiar not only with the rewards but also the challenges of working with clients at the end of their life. FHT Member, Ed Wicke, offers a moving, honest account of the highs and lows of working in palliative care…

Read article »

Image: Fotolia

comments

The Welsh government has published the results of the first ever national cancer patient experience survey in Wales

89% of those surveyed rated their overall care as either excellent or very good, which is fantastic.

The survey also shows the huge positive impact having a clinical nurse specialist or a key worker has on the experiences of people living with cancer.

However, it also highlights areas for improvement as a third of people were not given the name of a key worker and only 22% were given a written care plan, which are both commitments in the Welsh Government’s Cancer Delivery Plan.

Survey results »

Image: iStockphoto

comments
New research looks to identify carers and the support needed from health and social care services

Approximately 10% (c. 6.5 million) of the UK population have an unpaid caring role for a family member or friend. A large number of these carers – who often consider themselves as family or friends, rather than as ‘carers’ - are not accessing support services or benefits, and often struggle to cope, according to a recent report published in BMC Family Practice. 

Research article »
Image: iStockphoto

New research looks to identify carers and the support needed from health and social care services

Approximately 10% (c. 6.5 million) of the UK population have an unpaid caring role for a family member or friend. A large number of these carers – who often consider themselves as family or friends, rather than as ‘carers’ - are not accessing support services or benefits, and often struggle to cope, according to a recent report published in BMC Family Practice. 

Research article »

Image: iStockphoto

comments

Scarlet fever has reached its highest level in 20 years, reports BBC News

Public Health Wales (PHW) said the higher numbers could be related to the recent mild winter, but it had no firm evidence for that.

Speaking after the number of cases hit 139 last month, Dr Rhianwen Stiff, of PHW, advised parents to be vigilant of the symptoms.

At the time, children aged two to seven were the worst affected, and the highest number of cases was in Swansea.

She said: “Scarlet fever is highly contagious. Although most cases of scarlet fever are mild and will clear up in a week or so, a course of antibiotics can speed your recovery and will lessen the chances of spreading the infection to other people.”

Full article »

Image: iStockphoto

comments
Pulse Today announces that as part of an NHS England pilot, GPs are to support NHS 111 call centres, to increase clinical input. Read more at:

http://www.pulsetoday.co.uk/commissioning/commissioning-topics/urgent-care/gps-to-work-in-nhs-111-call-centres-under-nhs-england-pilot/20006441.article#.U0-NEqKgpI0
Image: iStockphoto

Pulse Today announces that as part of an NHS England pilot, GPs are to support NHS 111 call centres, to increase clinical input. Read more at:

http://www.pulsetoday.co.uk/commissioning/commissioning-topics/urgent-care/gps-to-work-in-nhs-111-call-centres-under-nhs-england-pilot/20006441.article#.U0-NEqKgpI0

Image: iStockphoto

comments

New research into the UK’s drinking attitudes and behaviours shows the majority of 25-65 year olds aren’t clear about how much they can drink without harming their health.

The research, conducted for alcohol education charity Drinkaware, suggests that just over two thirds of those surveyed don’t recognise how many units they can drink if they want to stay inside the lower risk guidelines.  More worrying still, most can’t say how many units there are in a glass of wine or a pint of beer.

Drinkaware is calling for three simple measures which will make it easier for everyone to understand how to drink in a low risk way:

  • All glasses in pubs and restaurants should have a unit line marked on them*
  • Pubs and restaurants should promote the 125ml wine glass
  • Alcohol retailers should be required to give unit information for all bottles and cans

The Chief Medical Officer, Dame Sally Davies, is currently reviewing the guidelines on alcohol consumption. Drinkaware is urging her to make them clearer and simpler so consumers will find it easier to use them.

Drinkaware says that units have got harder to understand over the years. When they were first introduced the guidelines advised that a standard glass of wine was the equivalent of a unit of alcohol. Now a standard glass is worth 2.3 units. That’s partly because there’s been significant measure creep. Back then a standard pub measure for wine was 125 ml, now a standard glass is 175 ml. At the same time there’s been alcohol inflation. In 1987 it was presumed that the average ABV of a glass of wine was between 8 and 10%, now it’s 13%.

Elaine Hindal, Chief Executive at alcohol education charity Drinkaware says:

“It’s clear that the unit guidelines aren’t working.  It’s not just that most people don’t know them, it’s that they don’t know how to apply the guidelines to the drink in front of them. It’s not surprising when you think how complicated they are. At the moment a ‘standard’ glass of 13% wine contains 2.3 units. Women are told they can drink 2-3 units within the guidelines and men are allowed 3-4. So it’s no wonder that people get confused about how much they can drink before exceeding them.

“Supersizing alcohol portions isn’t good for any of us. One simple change which could make a real difference would be to take the 125ml wine glass out of hiding. Pubs and restaurants are obliged to offer a 125ml serving but most advertise the 175 ml serving as a standard size and 250 ml as a large. You often have to go to the small print at the bottom of the menu to find out that a 125ml serving is even available and usually it’s not even priced. It’s just as bad at home. Our wine glasses have grown. 125ml is basically the size of a small yoghurt pot – if we could use a 125ml glass again for a standard serving of wine it would be a lot easier for people to stay within the guidelines.”

Drinkaware’s website helps people understand how much they are drinking and its impact on their health, providing tools like its unit and calorie calculator to help them cut down. For further information visit www.drinkaware.co.uk

Image: iStockphoto

comments

FHT’s AVR promoted to GP practice managers

Great news! The FHT’s Complementary Healthcare Therapist Register has been featured in a two-page article in the April 2014 issue of Practice Management, a magazine distributed to more than 5,500 GP practice managers in the UK. Practice managers play a vital role within GP surgeries – as well as being responsible for managing staff and budgets, they develop the practice’s business strategy, which can include signposting doctors and patients to additional health and social care services.  

Read the article in Practice Management »

Image: Practice Management  

comments

Do you work abroad?

Whether you have emigrated from the UK to a different country, or have always lived and worked in another country, the FHT would love to hear from members who work abroad to help us put together an article for International Therapist. 

If you would like to be involved, please email jreeves@fht.org.uk, answering the questions below.

Closing date: Sunday 8th June 2014

1. Which country do you live and work in?  

2. Tell us a little about your therapy work abroad….

3. Have you…. 

..always lived/worked in this country (Go to question 9)

…emigrated to this country (Go to question 4)

4. Did you train in the UK, or the country in which you now live?

5. Were your qualifications recognised abroad and ‘transferrable’, or did you need to go through various hoops? Are the standards the same?

6. What is the same and what are the differences between working in the UK and abroad?

7. What are the main considerations you have had to take into account when working somewhere other than the UK?

8. Are there any challenges you have faced working abroad (communication problems, e.g. understanding accents, cultural differences, etc)

9. What are the benefits of working in your country?

10. Is there regulation for therapy practice in your country?

11. Do you belong to a professional association in the country where you practise? 

12. Do you have insurance in the country where you practise?

13. What are the CPD opportunities like in your country, in terms of being able to build upon your existing knowledge/skills? 

14. Are complementary therapies widely accepted by the medical profession in your country? 

15. Any additional comments that you would like to add…..

Are you happy for the FHT to publish your comments in International Therapist and on the FHT website?

If you answered yes to question 16, and are happy for the FHT to publish your comments, are you happy for your name to be included alongside your comments?

Are you happy for the FHT to contact you for further information about your work in this field?

Thank you giving us an insight into your work.

Image: iStockphoto

comments