A night to remember

FHT’s special 50th Anniversary Gala Dinner and 2012 Excellence in Practice and Education Awards ceremony

As part of its 50th anniversary celebrations this year, the FHT hosted a special Gala Dinner on Friday 5 October at the prestigious Grange St Paul’s Hotel in London.

More than 200 FHT members, friends and supporters attended the event, hosted by Radio 2 presenter, Janey Lee Grace, to celebrate the association’s considerable achievements over the past five decades. 

Guests received a warm welcome from Jennifer Wayte, President of the FHT, and John French, CEO, before enjoying an impromptu pre-dinner speech by David Tredinnick MP, Chair of the All-Party Parliamentary Group for Integrated Health. Mr Tredinnick commented that with a new Secretary for Health who is keen to explore innovative ways to improve the health of the nation, the future looked promising for complementary therapists. 

Following a three-course dinner and table magic provided by Fay Presto and Hugh Nightingale, it was time for the much anticipated FHT 2012 Excellence in Education and Awards ceremony. These awards serve to recognise the outstanding work being carried out by both therapy practitioners and students, with the case study awards being kindly sponsored by FHT’s insurance underwriters, Hiscox. 

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Our biggest night of the year has arrived - the FHT 50th Anniversary Gala Dinner, featuring the FHT Excellence awards and hosted by BBC Radio 2 presenter and holistic therapies supporter, Janey Lee Grace.

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The FHT would just like to say a huge thank you for attending the FHT 50th Anniversary Training Congress and Exhibition at the weekend and for making it such a memorable event. The FHT would just like to say a huge thank you for attending the FHT 50th Anniversary Training Congress and Exhibition at the weekend and for making it such a memorable event. The FHT would just like to say a huge thank you for attending the FHT 50th Anniversary Training Congress and Exhibition at the weekend and for making it such a memorable event. The FHT would just like to say a huge thank you for attending the FHT 50th Anniversary Training Congress and Exhibition at the weekend and for making it such a memorable event. The FHT would just like to say a huge thank you for attending the FHT 50th Anniversary Training Congress and Exhibition at the weekend and for making it such a memorable event. The FHT would just like to say a huge thank you for attending the FHT 50th Anniversary Training Congress and Exhibition at the weekend and for making it such a memorable event.

The FHT would just like to say a huge thank you for attending the FHT 50th Anniversary Training Congress and Exhibition at the weekend and for making it such a memorable event.

Marie Polley introduces the importance of coping strategies when working with clients in palliative care
Do you consider yourself a ‘giver’ or a ‘receiver’ by nature? It is commonplace to find that therapists are the givers in this world, wanting to help other people. As practitioners we have been taught to keep ourselves healthy so that we can then treat others, however it is very easy to slip into focusing on others at the detriment to our own health.
Working with clients with cancer who are in palliative care can be extremely rewarding but can also leave you feeling emotionally drained at the end of a day. Technically, palliative care includes the phase when no more medical treatment is given to the person to directly treat the cancer (so the patient is terminally ill), and when care is provided to primarily control pain and support quality of life on all levels.
It is important to make sense of your own feelings that occur when you work with – or are thinking about working with – clients with cancer who are in palliative care. This line of work may make you face your own fears about death and dying, or revisit previous critical incidents in your own life.
It is fundamental to establish strategies that you can put in place to prevent emotional burnout, including reflective practice and clinical supervision, and the ever-more popular ‘mindfulness’ practice.
PS. Marie Polley will be hosting the lecture: Complementary therapies in palliative care (7 July, 2pm-3.15pm). www.fht.org.uk/50
Image: iStockphoto

Marie Polley introduces the importance of coping strategies when working with clients in palliative care

Do you consider yourself a ‘giver’ or a ‘receiver’ by nature? It is commonplace to find that therapists are the givers in this world, wanting to help other people. As practitioners we have been taught to keep ourselves healthy so that we can then treat others, however it is very easy to slip into focusing on others at the detriment to our own health.

Working with clients with cancer who are in palliative care can be extremely rewarding but can also leave you feeling emotionally drained at the end of a day. Technically, palliative care includes the phase when no more medical treatment is given to the person to directly treat the cancer (so the patient is terminally ill), and when care is provided to primarily control pain and support quality of life on all levels.

It is important to make sense of your own feelings that occur when you work with – or are thinking about working with – clients with cancer who are in palliative care. This line of work may make you face your own fears about death and dying, or revisit previous critical incidents in your own life.

It is fundamental to establish strategies that you can put in place to prevent emotional burnout, including reflective practice and clinical supervision, and the ever-more popular ‘mindfulness’ practice.

PS. Marie Polley will be hosting the lecture: Complementary therapies in palliative care (7 July, 2pm-3.15pm). www.fht.org.uk/50

Image: iStockphoto

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Following our blog from Dr Fiona Holland on re-evaluating judgements about our bodies to promote self-esteem, we have seen some real developments on this subject in recent days.  The All Party Parliamentary Group on Body Image has released a report, ‘Reflections on body image’, supporting the need for the promotion of positive body image:

“There is a growing amount of evidence that body image dissatisfaction is high and on the increase and is associated with a number of damaging consequences for health and wellbeing.”

It details concerns that negative body image can cause a lack of self-confidence, depression, physical, emotional and societal problems.

Click here to read the full report

Guardian article: MPs report that “Girls aged five worry about their body image”

BBC report: Body image issues cause bullying, according to MPs’ report

Dr Fiona Holland will be hosting the lecture: Building body esteem: re-evaluating judgements about the bodies we live in and work with (8 July, 3.30pm-4.45pm). www.fht.org.uk/50

International Therapist: FHT members can read Dr Fiona Holland’s article on body esteem, published in October IT (pages 36-38), by clicking here

Copyright (c) 123RF Stock Photos

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For those therapists who are not familiar with fascia, James Earls describes what it is and why all the fuss.

I am sure most of you have noticed a new word creeping into the anatomy and bodywork lexicon in the past few years, which makes it seem as if fascia is a new discovery. In fact, it has been around for years but was previously just a little ignored.

Fascia has been researched for many years, particularly in animal movement studies, but it is only through the interest of a few specialised bodyworkers that the research and its implications have come to the wider bodywork audience. Robert Schleip, Tom Myers and Gil Hedley, to name just a few, have been flying the flag for this wrapping, protecting, elastic, adaptive, continuous tissue for the past decade or so. They, among others, are showing the need to re-evaluate the anatomy books to take into account the huge contribution of this tissue, which was previously seen as relatively inert and often simply discarded during dissections.

Fascia is a general term used to apply to many other tissues you will be familiar with – tendon, ligament, aponeurosis, epimysium endomysium and perimysium, which are all made up of fascial connective tissue. Fascia glides, rebounds, protects, communicates and even contracts. If you understand the characteristics of fascia you can take advantage of these within your manual therapy of whatever form, because you cannot touch the body without influencing it.

PS. James Earls will be hosting the lecture: Revealing the myofascia (7 July, 10am-11.15am). www.fht.org.uk/50

Image: iStockphoto

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Dr Fiona Holland explains what made her realise that re-evaluating judgements about our bodies to promote self-esteem was an important area to look into…
I became interested in body-based messages while studying sport psychology and when I later worked for a company that offered nutrition counselling, exercise programming and self-esteem training for people who were clinically overweight or obese. I realised that people – especially women – struggle with messages about food and health, regardless of their shape or size.
I later learned about the work of Jonathan Robison and Karen Carrier, who proposed that health and wellness should be redefined and messages around weight, exercise and food re-evaluated as people were feeling increasingly less at peace with their bodies. They suggested that people should move away from diet and exercise regimes and towards learning what their bodies needed in terms of food and movement. In my massage training that followed, I realised that touch could help people reconnect with their bodies and I led a study with women who, via receiving massage, began to feel more positive about their bodies.
In my private practice I came across many clients who used body-shaming statements and I supported them in moving beyond these, using massage and more neutral language. As a lecturer and researcher, I discovered that body esteem and dissatisfaction is essentially rooted in our self-esteem and self-beliefs, with many people constantly striving for the unreachable body ideals we are fed by the media. I aim to help both therapists and clients to free themselves from this energy-sapping process and to befriend their body by appreciating what it can do rather than solely what it looks like.
PS. Dr Fiona Holland will be hosting the lecture: Building body esteem: re-evaluating judgements about the bodies we live in and work with (8 July, 3.30pm-4.45pm). www.fht.org.uk/50
Copyright (c) 123RF Stock Photos

Dr Fiona Holland explains what made her realise that re-evaluating judgements about our bodies to promote self-esteem was an important area to look into…

I became interested in body-based messages while studying sport psychology and when I later worked for a company that offered nutrition counselling, exercise programming and self-esteem training for people who were clinically overweight or obese. I realised that people – especially women – struggle with messages about food and health, regardless of their shape or size.

I later learned about the work of Jonathan Robison and Karen Carrier, who proposed that health and wellness should be redefined and messages around weight, exercise and food re-evaluated as people were feeling increasingly less at peace with their bodies. They suggested that people should move away from diet and exercise regimes and towards learning what their bodies needed in terms of food and movement. In my massage training that followed, I realised that touch could help people reconnect with their bodies and I led a study with women who, via receiving massage, began to feel more positive about their bodies.

In my private practice I came across many clients who used body-shaming statements and I supported them in moving beyond these, using massage and more neutral language. As a lecturer and researcher, I discovered that body esteem and dissatisfaction is essentially rooted in our self-esteem and self-beliefs, with many people constantly striving for the unreachable body ideals we are fed by the media. I aim to help both therapists and clients to free themselves from this energy-sapping process and to befriend their body by appreciating what it can do rather than solely what it looks like.

PS. Dr Fiona Holland will be hosting the lecture: Building body esteem: re-evaluating judgements about the bodies we live in and work with (8 July, 3.30pm-4.45pm). www.fht.org.uk/50

Copyright (c) 123RF Stock Photos

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Beauty UK and Holistic Health 2012 took place on Sunday and Monday at the NEC, Birmingham, offering visitors an array of products, equipment, services and training from the leading beauty and holistic suppliers.

We popped into VTCT Gold, as they too celebrate their 50th anniversary year, and we were wowed by the theatrical make-up taking place next door at WorldSkills UK - very envious of those who experienced relaxing treatments as part of the competition!  It was great to catch up with complementary therapists in the training village, offering unique treatments and innovative new products.  The Chill Out Zone was chilled out indeed but, sadly, we didn’t have time to stop for an Indian Head Massage.

Learn, shop and celebrate with us at the FHT 50th Anniversary Training Congress and Exhibition on 7th and 8th July, featuring:

  • Over 70 lectures and workshops from experts in the industry
  • Free exhibition entry and show offers from leading complementary, beauty and sports suppliers
  • VIP drinks reception 
  • Discounted museum tickets at our venue, the Heritage Motor Centre
  • Free parking
  • Members’ lounge and lots more.

Book now at www.fht.org.uk/50

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We’re so excited about FHT’s 50th anniversary year!  With our Training Congress and Exhibition less than two months away and our Gala Dinner in October, there’s a lot to look forward to.  Local Support Groups are planning local events, with their own celebrations and expert speakers, too.

We would love to show your 50th celebrations on this blog - please email your photos to Jade (jrimell@fht.org.uk)

Image: iStockphoto

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Dr Marilyn Glenville discusses the nutritional advice that she would give all women, and why…
I would like women to realise that sugar and foods that are broken down into sugar quickly – white flour, for example – are the major culprits behind many of their health problems. Many of the symptoms that women experience, from irritability, anxiety and insomnia, to palpitations, headaches and fatigue, are often due to fluctuating blood sugar levels caused by caffeine and sugar, as well as long gaps without eating.
Low- or no-fat alternatives are not the answer, as a low-fat fruit yogurt (even organic) could contain eight teaspoons of added sugar. Added sugar and caffeine should be eliminated for 80 per cent of the time and people should also eat little and often, ideally every three hours.
Most women I see are exhausted, which often ties in with their stressful lives and is reflected in the way they eat. Food and drink such as coffee and chocolate provide a quick fix but create a vicious cycle of highs and lows; the lows cause a release of the stress hormones and they end up feeling even more stressed.
Following a stressful event, increased cortisol levels cause an appetite surge because the body thinks it should refuel after all the fighting or fleeing. Women under constant stress quite often feel constantly hungry, craving carbohydrates and fats, often in the form of high-sugar, high-fat comfort and convenience food.
If the body does not fight or flee as expected, the fat and glucose gets deposited as fat around the middle of the body and any sugary or fatty foods eaten due to the poststress appetite surge will potentially cause further weight gain there too.
PS. Dr Marilyn Glenville will be hosting the lectures: Fat around the middle – risks of cancer and other illness (7 July, 1pm-1.45pm) and Natural solutions to the menopause (8 July, 2pm-3.15pm). www.fht.org.uk/50
Copyright (c) 123RF Stock Photos

Dr Marilyn Glenville discusses the nutritional advice that she would give all women, and why…

I would like women to realise that sugar and foods that are broken down into sugar quickly – white flour, for example – are the major culprits behind many of their health problems. Many of the symptoms that women experience, from irritability, anxiety and insomnia, to palpitations, headaches and fatigue, are often due to fluctuating blood sugar levels caused by caffeine and sugar, as well as long gaps without eating.

Low- or no-fat alternatives are not the answer, as a low-fat fruit yogurt (even organic) could contain eight teaspoons of added sugar. Added sugar and caffeine should be eliminated for 80 per cent of the time and people should also eat little and often, ideally every three hours.

Most women I see are exhausted, which often ties in with their stressful lives and is reflected in the way they eat. Food and drink such as coffee and chocolate provide a quick fix but create a vicious cycle of highs and lows; the lows cause a release of the stress hormones and they end up feeling even more stressed.

Following a stressful event, increased cortisol levels cause an appetite surge because the body thinks it should refuel after all the fighting or fleeing. Women under constant stress quite often feel constantly hungry, craving carbohydrates and fats, often in the form of high-sugar, high-fat comfort and convenience food.

If the body does not fight or flee as expected, the fat and glucose gets deposited as fat around the middle of the body and any sugary or fatty foods eaten due to the poststress appetite surge will potentially cause further weight gain there too.

PS. Dr Marilyn Glenville will be hosting the lectures: Fat around the middle – risks of cancer and other illness (7 July, 1pm-1.45pm) and Natural solutions to the menopause (8 July, 2pm-3.15pm). www.fht.org.uk/50

Copyright (c) 123RF Stock Photos

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